May: Open House Means Open House

When I worked for a Diocesan Office for Catholic Schools, some of the schools held an Open House during the Spring so that parents of prospective students could see the school in excellent condition.  After all, excellent academics should be presented in an excellent environment, right?  Desks were cleaned, floors were swept, the students’ best work was displayed on the walls of the halls, and, of course, “Open House” events were held – at night, when there would be no distractions from children currently in the school, and teachers would not be disrupted.

If you’re still following that formula, I’ll bet you’re having difficulty growing your school.

Reserving one night for an Open House for parents of prospective students is the sibling of the Web page for a school’s Internet presence rather than an appropriately designed Web site.  Some schools leaders have countered, “Oh, but we have a Facebook page!”  True – but that’s still a page.  Your school’s Web site needs to have a “modern” look to it, and also needs to be responsive.  That is, it will automatically adjust itself to the device that the viewer is using (computer, tablet, or handheld device) to provide an optimal UX (user experience).  And since mobile devices are becoming more and more popular, it’s good to think “mobile first” when designing – no, architecting – your school’s presence on the Web.

About 9 years ago, I saw several private schools move to 5 Open House events – one in September, one in October, one in November, one in February and one in March.  My first thought was that school leaders were catching on.  August is when the new school year is just getting underway, and parents that are thinking about where their children will be enrolling next year have school at the front of their minds in the Fall.  Here in the Northeast, December and January can be horribly affected by inclement weather, which is why it’s not really a good idea for a Catholic school to have its only Open House of the year during Catholic Schools Week at the end of January.  By April and May, some schools are starting to collect tuition for the coming school year, so Open House events during those months could conflict with year-end activities like school plays, field day events, Spring concerts, and, of course, standardized testing.

Still, even with 5 Open House events, some of these schools are still struggling with enrollment targets!

Then I discovered a text called “Marketing Christian Schools: The Definitive Guide” from GraceWorks Ministries in Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Dan Krause and Bob Rogalski have compiled an excellent text for not just Christian schools, but for Catholic schools as well since the mechanics of the Advancement side of the equation holds true for any faith-based school.  The text recommends weekly Open House events.  Now that your mouthful of coffee has sprayed across the table, doing so makes the Open House a regular event so that the school is always kept in excellent shape and always ready to welcome parents who might not be able to make it during previous weeks because of the demands of their schedules.

Recall that Enrollment = Sales.  They both have congruent path-like “funnels” associated with them, as “Inquiry –> Interview –> Tour –> Application –> Acceptance” can be compared to “Lead –> Meeting –> Presentation/Demonstration –> Purchase Consultation –> Close.”  The interesting thing is that due to the advent of the Internet, the buying process has changed.  Prospective customers that used to contact a sales representative to get information about their products and services are now up to 75% through the sales process by the time they contact the sales representative.  They buyer has changed, because they’ve researched their options through their own due diligence.

I can personally attest to this trend.  Three summers ago, after putting 230,000+ miles on my Jeep in 6 years, it was time to get a new vehicle.  I decided what I’ll be getting via Internet research, tested some vehicles when I could rent them, and talked to owners of the vehicles on my short list.  I also knew what I was willing to pay for the vehicle I chose, so the only thing I really needed to do was visit a showroom for that brand of vehicle.  I thought I’d have to order the car to specification since the days of dealing and discounting so a dealer could move a car off his lot are gone.  If you’ve been through this process recently, see if this conversation sounds familiar:

“We have the car you’re looking for, except that it’s silver and not black, and has a sunroof.”

“But I don’t want a sunroof.”

“But it’s only going to make your payment $21 a month more.”

“And they leak and cut out 2 inches of headroom, plus they can crack in the winter.  I’ve seen them shatter, too!  No, no sunroof.”

“Okay, then we’ll just give you the sunroof if you take the car home today.”

“But I don’t want a sunroof.”

“But it’s great to let the heat out of the car and make the air conditioning work better, and there’s a shade to make it look like it’s not there.  And, with the sunroof, you get maplights too.”

That type of conversation doesn’t really happen anymore.  Besides, if I don’t get what I want from that retailer (not dealer), then I’ll visit another one to be treated the way I want to be treated.

If that type of exchange resonates with you, please know that’s precisely the mindset of today’s parents of children who are considering your school as the educational environment of choice for their children.  Not only does your school have to provide what they expect (and if they can’t find it, homeschooling is a viable option), you and your school must be accessible to them.  Virtual tour videos on your school’s Web site is a great first step.

Wait – videos – as in plural?

Yes.

Your new Open House event is going to be whenever they’re available to stop by and you’re available to meet with them, which means those weekly scheduled Open House events will also become history very soon.  Certainly, setting an appointment is appropriate.  After all, you want to give them your full attention when they visit the school.  But that’s your mindset, and not necessarily the mindset of your customer.  Your “Open House” could be a physical event at your school, or it could be a virtual one, consisting of multiple videos on YouTube or Vimeo linked to your school’s Web site.  Then, the appointment becomes the event where parents discover how they AND their children will be treated by your school.

As for the format of the appointment, will it be:

A) A personal appointment;

B) A meeting consisting of a small group of parents of prospective students; or

C) One that’s in a large group format in a school cafeteria where everyone feels like they’re being lectured to?

Trying to decide?  Think about which type of meeting you would like to experience.  Now think of how you can build community at your school.  Did your answer change? Note how there’s not a right or wrong answer – it all depends on what type of experience you want to provide for your students and for their parents.